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Events

Tuesday August 6th
Building Communities in Virtual Space (Access Conf. Topic) (4 comments)
The Web As a Global Desktop (Access Conf. Topic) (0 comments)
eContent & Libraries (Access Conf. Topic) (1 comments)
Open Source Software & Libraries (Access Conf. Topic) (2 comments)
Are We There Yet? (Access Conf. Topic) (2 comments)

Saturday June 15th
Live from ALA (1 comments)

Older Stories...

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Building Communities in Virtual Space (Access Conf. Topic)

By art, Section Events
Posted on Tue Aug 6th, 2002 at 09:00:45 AM EST
Libraries have traditionally been a focal point of the communities they serve. With the advent of the Internet and the Web, new tools have appeared to foster community information sharing and interaction, and networks like K-Net demonstrate well the power of community networking. Libraries were in the forefront of the Freenet movement a decade ago and have initiated many digitization efforts to bring cultural and heritage collections to the Web. Gutenberg's invention of the printing press was able to dramatically change the way information was shared to some extent because the technology of the time allowed for the concurrent production of relatively cheap paper. Although the Internet may form a significant component to current media as a distribution and communications medium, its analogy to paper for the printing press is significantly different in this regard. Libraries are a logical choice to bridge the oft-termed "digital divide" between those who the facilities to engage in electronic communications and the significant proportion of society that does not have the means to interact with digital formats. If libraries have a historical and important role to play in allowing the broadest spectrum of society to take advantage of all forms of communication, how can libraries best support and foster initiatives in community empowerment and networking?

(4 comments, 257 words in story) Full Story

The Web As a Global Desktop (Access Conf. Topic)

By art, Section Events
Posted on Tue Aug 6th, 2002 at 09:00:38 AM EST
Behold the browser, one of the most durable artifacts of the Web. Remember Gopher, WAIS, Hyper-G, and, for that matter, the dozens of alternative clients and browser variations that existed before Netscape and Internet Explorer obliterated almost all other options? The modern web browser has become the conduit to the public face of computing for most organizations. Opera has shown that there is still room for well-behaved browser applications that don't take over the desktop, and browser checking sites still list dozens of browsers that thrive on the fringes of the computing landscape. How much work is it to create web services for alternative browsers and non-PC applications? Where does XML fit in for fueling and managing web sites? What do web designers and information architects need to take into account in order to serve those with disabilities? What hasn't the Web done for libraries, and why not?

(194 words in story) Full Story

eContent & Libraries (Access Conf. Topic)

By art, Section Events
Posted on Tue Aug 6th, 2002 at 09:00:30 AM EST
The estimates for the amount of materials available on the Internet are subject to some debate, but there is no doubt that it is growing at a phenomenal pace. Libraries have adjusted existing tools and created new ones to continue meet the goal of providing access to the best selection of virtual and physical resources for the community. What does the future hold for Cataloguing? Where does Z39.50 fit in an online world that seems determined to be powered by Internet search engines? What is the role of Web and XML-savvy standards like Docbook and OAI in library services? How should libraries use these technologies to promote resource-sharing?

(1 comment, 156 words in story) Full Story

Open Source Software & Libraries (Access Conf. Topic)

By art, Section Events
Posted on Tue Aug 6th, 2002 at 09:00:16 AM EST
Do libraries have a natural synergy with the Open Source Software (OSS) movement? Library collections, library staff, and even the physical structures themselves are usually widely available to a community of users on a non-profit, publicly funded basis. There is also an impressive and growing list of library-based OSS projects at oss4lib, but do libraries have the development resources and/or political will to push OSS into all levels of the organization? Are some OSS targets (small database systems, scripting solutions) more appropriate than others (ILL systems, large-scale ILS applications)?

(2 comments, 136 words in story) Full Story

Are We There Yet? (Access Conf. Topic)

By art, Section Events
Posted on Tue Aug 6th, 2002 at 09:00:04 AM EST
As the Access conferences near a decade of showcasing library applications of technology, it seems appropriate to ask whether we have been able to take good advantage of the global networks and future services that seemed just around the corner when Access first started. Reporting on his efforts to web-enable the Crafts Council on the sunny shores of Prince Edward Island back when gopher was a serious contender for http traffic and WAIS was the preferred option for online searching, Peter Rukavina perfectly captured the sense of the early days of the web and what directions seemed to make most sense in an Access session entitled Adventures on the Information Red Clay Road: Getting Wired Cheap. Has the promise been delivered? Where has the Information Red Clay Road led us?

(2 comments, 177 words in story) Full Story

Live from ALA

By jaf, Section Events
Posted on Sat Jun 15th, 2002 at 02:26:18 PM EST
I've been in Atlanta since Wednesday, and will be posting updates on the happenings here at ALA Annual on a periodic basis. (The updates appear in my diary, which you can get to through the link above).

-- JF

(1 comment) Comments >>

<< Previous 7

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